Comments for bobbekinworld http://netdreamerpublications.com for bobbekins Fri, 12 Dec 2014 07:39:49 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on Toy Story 3 The Video Game – Nintendo DS by Jared Castle "Oregon writer" /toys/toy-story-3-the-video-game-nintendo-ds/comment-page-1/#comment-1007 Fri, 12 Dec 2014 07:39:49 +0000 /toys/toy-story-3-the-video-game-nintendo-ds/#comment-1007
32 of 35 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars
Story mode is too short and a poor value for young players, August 23, 2010
By 
Jared Castle “Oregon writer” (Southern Oregon) –
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)
  
(VINE VOICE)
  

= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Toy Story 3 The Video Game – Nintendo DS (Video Game)
My sons (ages 7 & 6) finished this game in a single afternoon. Worse yet, they showed no interest in replaying it, making Toy Story 3 my most expensive DS purchase. A good game can last weeks, even months with repeated play. Geez, we still have two copies of Mario Kart and we purchased them nearly two years ago!

The story mode mixes adventure play and mini-games. Beware though, story mode is very short. The game offers two other modes – Imaginary World and Playtime. The game also includes DGamer features for online play, including special achievements that can be unlocked and shared with friends.

Of course, none of these extras appealed to my kids. I attribute part of the problem to the fact that my sons were born *after* Toy Story and Toy Story 2. They have no nostalgia for Woody and Buzz. So, the game had to win them over on its own merits.

Even the large cache of unlockables available wasn’t enough to entice them to play the game again once they finished the story mode.

What caught my attention immediately was the voice work and background music. Woody, in particular, went from cute to excruciating annoying inside of 15 minutes. He repeated the same lines repeatedly in a higher pitch than I remembered from the movies. His voice in the game version reminded me of something you might hear from a fortune teller coin-op.

I want to note that the game looks good (the game trailer was part of the reason I bought the game in the first place). The 3D environment is trippy and surprisingly easy to navigate.

In summary, the story mode is very short. Make sure your kids are huge fans of the Toy Story trilogy before making this purchase. The game’s value will depend on their play of the other two modes – Imaginary World and Playtime – and an interest in searching out all of the unlockables. For our sons, this game couldn’t hold their interest for a second day. Rating: two stars.

0

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No

]]>
Comment on Toy Story 3 The Video Game – Nintendo DS by JOHN SPANGLER "Johnny Spang" /toys/toy-story-3-the-video-game-nintendo-ds/comment-page-1/#comment-1006 Fri, 12 Dec 2014 07:30:27 +0000 /toys/toy-story-3-the-video-game-nintendo-ds/#comment-1006
46 of 51 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars
A hit and miss situation…, July 7, 2010
By 

= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This review is from: Toy Story 3 The Video Game – Nintendo DS (Video Game)
First of all I’m a Toy Story junkie. I was kinda worried about a game this big in the palm of my hand. In a nutshell, while Toy Story 3 has it’s problems, I still think it’s worth a buy especially if you have 6-12yo in the house. I personally was bored with many of the mini games. Some are just annoying and I Just wanted to move on. On the other hand, many were a blast. But most of the little ones in your world won’t mind.

The game is a mix of a ton of mini games, a big story mode and some platforming elements. I had soem problems with the moments where jumping and lining up jumps is important in the adventure levels and having to use the stick, but most will catch on pretty fast. The graphics are well done, albeit a little grainy in parts and I thought the audio was a little tinny. But considering the amount of things to do and play in Toy Story 3, most won’t mind. One major issue with families with multiple kids. The game only allows you to save one game on the cartridge which is a big no no for DS games. So if a child wants to start over, it will erase the current file. So keep that in mind. But overall, if you just want a lot of things to do and you like Toy Story, it’s worth a serious look.

0

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No

]]>
Comment on Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Book 1 by Anonymous /toys/diary-of-a-wimpy-kid-book-1/comment-page-1/#comment-1005 Thu, 11 Dec 2014 22:16:38 +0000 /toys/diary-of-a-wimpy-kid-book-1/#comment-1005
74 of 89 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
Hilarious Even for Adults, December 8, 2007
By 
Noah D. Karchmer “hawknoah” (Maryland) –
(REAL NAME)
  

This review is from: Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Book 1 (Hardcover)
I learned of this book in my University of Maryland alumni magazine and I’m very glad I did. The author, Jeff Kinney, wrote a popular comic strip called “Igdoof” in the early 90’s for the Maryland student newspaper, the Diamondback. His comic alone made me look forward to each new issue of the paper and I continued to seek it out even after I graduated to read Kinney’s comic.

From what I understand, he fought to get the strip syndicated after he graduated, but it never happened- presumably because his somewhat simplistic and crude artistic style is nothing like what you see in the daily comics sections. I had often wondered what became of Kinney, whose considerable talent should not be going to waste, so I was happy to pick this book up once I discovered it.

The book, likely written for kids at or above a fifth or sixth grade reading level, was better reading for a 37 year old than I could have possibly imagined. Kinney picks up right where he left off with the Igdoof strip with the very same humor and art that made me enjoy it so much. The book was laugh-out-loud funny throughout and I would recommend it to not only kids, but anyone who can appreciate humor books. I wish Jeff all the success in the world and look forward to reading more of his works– he has really found his calling.

0

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No

]]>
Comment on Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Book 1 by Noah D. Karchmer "hawknoah" /toys/diary-of-a-wimpy-kid-book-1/comment-page-1/#comment-1004 Thu, 11 Dec 2014 21:50:02 +0000 /toys/diary-of-a-wimpy-kid-book-1/#comment-1004
46 of 48 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars
Diary of a Wimpy Kid, August 5, 2008
By 
Jordan K. Henrichs “teacher” (Cedar Falls, IA) –
(REAL NAME)
  

This review is from: Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Book 1 (Hardcover)
If there was an “IT” book of 2008 in the school where I teach 5th grade, forget about Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows; it had to be Jeff Kinney’s Diary of a Wimpy Kid. Book orders could not send copies fast enough. Book stores could not restock their shelves quickly enough. Everywhere I turned I was met by a student with his or her nose buried in its pages. So naturally, I had to see what all the fuss was about.

Greg Heffley is your everyday, run-of-the-mill, middle school “wimp”. Sure, someday he’s going to amount to something big, but for now, he’s “stuck in middle school with a bunch of morons.” Greg’s journal, not “diary”, but “journal”, takes us through the hilarious events that make up Greg’s days in his first year of middle school. Lucky for us, whether it’s avoiding his older brother Rodrick, or abusing his best friend Rowley, Greg’s days are never short on laughs.

I can’t remember the last time I laughed this hard when reading a book. There are laughs on every page, literally. Greg’s mudslinging student council posters, Greg and Rowley’s failed attempt at a haunted house, the students’ wrestling unit in PE (“muscles are gross”), and Christmas time at the Heffley home. Situations like these that Greg finds himself in are comical enough, but it’s his voice and commentary that sets this book apart. Jeff Kinney has cleverly captured the inner workings of a middle school student, and because of this book’s popularity, it’s obvious that students connect with Greg.

However, that’s also what scares me about this book. I’m afraid that Kinney is too smart for his own good and without realizing it, has created a lovable character that advocates laziness and using your best friend for his family’s money and his video games. Beneath all the laughs, Greg is a deceitful, selfish, jerk of a boy and the fact that students relate to him so easily doesn’t sit well with me. I admit, I laughed hysterically at Kinney’s tongue-in-cheek irony, but I’m an adult. I can tell the difference between Greg the character being serious and Jeff the author being sarcastic. I’m not so sure all the kids reading this will be able to.

I’m torn though. This book is funny and relevant and I guess if children are excited about reading it, then who am I to complain. Any time children WANT to read, it’s a good thing, and I commend Kinney for this. He’s discovered a great medium to tell his stories. The pictures only add to the humor and the journal format makes for an easy read. I think most of my students would be able to distinguish between Greg’s selfish behavior and acceptable, respectful behavior, and if they don’t, eh . . . kids will be kids. Either way, I have a feeling that Kinney is going to be around for a while. I may be better off enjoying the laughs.

0

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No

]]>
Comment on Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Book 1 by Jordan K. Henrichs "teacher" /toys/diary-of-a-wimpy-kid-book-1/comment-page-1/#comment-1003 Thu, 11 Dec 2014 21:45:22 +0000 /toys/diary-of-a-wimpy-kid-book-1/#comment-1003
329 of 351 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars
Fun for older kids and adults…, August 14, 2010
A Kid’s Review
This review is from: Diary of a Wimpy Kid (Paperback)
As a (more mature) 13 year old, I thought this book was genuinely funny. However, unlike younger kids, I’ve already established what is right and wrong. Cheating, lying, manipulating, and acting dumb “just to get less work” is all in this book, and when my younger eight year old brother reads this, I get paranoid of what exactly he’s picking up. He doesn’t seem to want to go to a gifted program at school, thinks less of school, and I think it is because of this book! To older audiences, Greg is a very interesting character (which is the prevelant reason why the series is so popular) but he is one of the most irresponsible fictional characters I have come across in a long time. And since the story is told from HIS viewpoint, it even makes it worse! His mind thinks of the all the previously mentioned things to be perfectly fine. I would absoluetly not recommend this book to…more vulnerble kids.

On the plus side, the novel IS truely funny, with its charming digital drawings and witty main character- who keeps the story lively (ignoring his bad influence) throughout the entire book.

0

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No

]]>
Comment on The Story of Ferdinand by Anonymous /toys/the-story-of-ferdinand/comment-page-1/#comment-1002 Thu, 11 Dec 2014 12:51:28 +0000 /toys/the-story-of-ferdinand/#comment-1002
45 of 47 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
Love this Book!, September 5, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Story of Ferdinand (Hardcover)
My mother-in-law gave me her copy of this book (printed in 1938) when my oldest child was 4 or 5 years old and we just adored this story! In fact, she (my daughter) loved it so much she memorized it within months. I chose this book to read to her 2nd grade class and they, too, felt the magic of how the fierce bull loved to just sit and “smell the flowers”! I just sat down tonight to read it for the first time to my youngest child (5 years old) and he already knew how the story went. I asked him how he knew it and if his sister already read it to him, because I had not yet done so. He told me that nobody read it to him, that his sister (now 11 years old) already told him about it. He went on to explain every page to me before I even read it! Maybe it’s because it’s such a different subject for a children’s book ( a bull, a tree, a bee and oh, those flowers!) or it could be because we don’t have a great deal of access to bull fighting here in America…none the less, it’s a story that stays with you, if only because of it’s simplicity. Kind of refreshing.

0

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No

]]>
Comment on The Story of Ferdinand by JLind555 /toys/the-story-of-ferdinand/comment-page-1/#comment-1001 Thu, 11 Dec 2014 12:37:07 +0000 /toys/the-story-of-ferdinand/#comment-1001
71 of 72 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
One for the ages, November 11, 2002
By 

This review is from: The Story of Ferdinand (Hardcover)
“Ferdinand” is one of the best-loved children’s books of all time, and with good reason. This timeless tale of a little bull in Spain who doesn’t mind being different from the rest of the herd strikes an instant chord in youngsters and oldsters alike. Ferdinand is a gentle creature who would rather sit around and smell the flowers than butt his way through life; but when he planks himself down one day on a bumblebee, he gets a jolt that propels him into the bullring in Madrid. The story is funny and endearing, and the illustrations are hilarious. Generations of preschoolers have loved this book, and it looks good for generations to come.

0

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No

]]>
Comment on The Story of Ferdinand by slomamma /toys/the-story-of-ferdinand/comment-page-1/#comment-1000 Thu, 11 Dec 2014 11:41:27 +0000 /toys/the-story-of-ferdinand/#comment-1000
269 of 274 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
Blessed are the peacemakers., September 26, 2001
By 
slomamma (San Luis Obispo, CA USA) –

This book is more than sixty years old. I remember hearing it as a small child in the early sixties, and even then it sounded strangely old-fashioned to me, as if it came from some sweet, gentle world that had not existed for a long time. But as a child I passionately loved that world, and this book that evoked its gentleness, and years later, when I found out I was pregnant, the first thing I bought for my son was not a blanket or a crib or a stuffed animal, but a copy of Ferdinand. It was the thing I loved most from my own childhood. Seventeen years later, I still think my priorities were right. And that seventeen year old has a six year old sister, so the book is still in use.
Ferdinand has been around so long, I assume everybody knows the story, but in case you don’t, here goes: Ferdinand is a gentle little bull in Spain. The other little bulls love to fight and dream of being chosen for the bullfights in Madrid. But by mistake, Ferdinand is sent to fight. The only problem is, he will not fight.. They lead him into the bullring, but he just sits there, smelling the flowers in the women’s hair, and in the end there is nothing the matadors can do but take him home.
I suppose people have been reading this book to children for more than sixty years in part because of its pacifist message. In essence, Ferdinand is the one who would not come when they gave a war. But for me that is just a small part of its appeal. Robert Lawson’s absolutely perfect illustrations show a world that is often mean and ugly (the stupid expressions on the faces of the men who come to choose the bulls are classics), or else petty and foolish (check out the fussy clothes and snooty expressions of the matadors), but Ferdinand, always true to himself, is oblivious to this world, and just goes on living his own life in his own way. In the end that quality is a force that nothing can alter.
Reading Ferdinand always leaves me believing that goodness is a powerful, unshakeable force. That is a message I find very comforting lately.

0

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No

]]>
Comment on The Giving Tree by anjanette seewer-reynolds "anjie reynolds" /toys/the-giving-tree/comment-page-1/#comment-999 Thu, 11 Dec 2014 01:34:43 +0000 /toys/the-giving-tree/#comment-999
93 of 106 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars
And the tree was happy, but not really: A 35 year old reflects…, December 25, 2005
By 

This review is from: The Giving Tree (Hardcover)
I’ve been a Shel Silverstein admirer since I first received Where the Sidewalk Ends as a first grader back in 1976. The way Silverstein combines stark sketches with punchy language and ideas could woo almost any child.

As with most of his work, what makes it funny or appealing is his ability to write about humans at their most vulnerable or disillusioned states (poems like “The Land of Happy,” “Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout,” “Jumping Rope” come to mind), and kids love that raw edge to him. The Giving Tree, however, is surprisingly subversive. It looks purely sweet at first, seeming to be about a love between a tree and a boy, and the beauty of doing anything for someone you love.

But it is TRAGIC. The tree ends up with nothing (she’s a stump for him to eventually sit on), and the boy ends up an unhappy and lonely old man who has exploited (devestated) something he once loved.

Now, thirty years after my first reading of it, I’m not sure where I stand. This book was meaningful to me as a child–there was complexity in it, in giving and taking and paying consequences (and the pictures evoked great emotion). On the other hand, an obvious and simple message it could send is that it is good to give (and to take) at all cost.

In the end, I don’t think the book should be avoided, by any means, because of its seemingly “selfless” message, but I do think it should be discussed (even in simple terms with the smallest child) as an eye-opening rendering of the danger of giving too much and losing yourself in the process.

0

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No

]]>
Comment on The Giving Tree by L'lee /toys/the-giving-tree/comment-page-1/#comment-998 Thu, 11 Dec 2014 01:13:04 +0000 /toys/the-giving-tree/#comment-998
566 of 652 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars
A CONTROVERSIAL Classic to promote family discussion, November 28, 2005
By 
L’lee (upstate NY, USA) –

This review is from: The Giving Tree (Hardcover)
There are two extreme ways to interpret this book, as shown by the multiple ratings of 1 and 5.

The first: This is a beautiful and sad story of unconditional love between a tree and a boy, in which the tree is generous and gives of itself to help the boy whenever he is in trouble. The metaphor in this case is that of a mother and a child, or God and a human.

The second: This is a story of a very selfish boy and a tree who loves him. Whenever he is in trouble, he returns to the tree who gives him another part of her self without ever setting limits, even though it makes her sad (and physically damages her) to do so. In this case, you can compare the story to a metaphor of an abusive, codependent relationship.

I can understand both views of this story, but the fact that the second interpretation is just as valid as the first makes me hesitate to recommend this book. Personally, I would NOT buy this book as a gift, or for my own children. If I had this book, I would wait to read it to my children until they reach the recommended 10 years old (or at least 8), and then I would discuss the book and its concepts (selfishness, limit setting/saying NO) with them. “What did you think of this book?” “Do you think that the tree/the boy did the right thing?” “What would you have done differently if you were the tree/the boy?” “If you were the tree, would you have said ‘NO’ to the boy at any point?”

A story that may be complementary to this one and more appropriate for younger audiences is “Ladies First”, also by Shel Silverstein (found in “A Light in the Attic” or “Free to Be, You and Me”), which is about a girl who always gets to be first to do everything, but in the end that is not to her advantage. At least in that book the message is clear that selfishness is not OK.

If you prefer to avoid this type of discussion, you might be better off sticking to one of the MANY childrens’ books that are much less controversial and intended only for entertainment.

0

Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 

Was this review helpful to you? Yes
No

]]>